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Native American Genealogy Resources - Southwest Tribes

This guide will assist you in locating some of the useful Native American genealogical resources in New Mexico and the greater Southwest region.

 

Collections of interest on the Library Edition of Ancestry.com available on New Mexico State Library computers:

U.S., Indian Census Rolls, 1885-1940

This database contains an index to the Indian census rolls from 1885-1940. Information contained in this database includes: name (Indian and/or English), gender, age, birth date, relationship to head of family, marital status, tribe name, and agency and reservation name. Other information about an individual, such as degree of Indian blood, as recorded in the later census years, may be available on the original record. Be sure to view the corresponding image in order to obtain all possible information about an individual.

Schedules of Special Census of Indians, 1880

Each record in this collection includes two images on which enumerators were to record details about the residents of one dwelling. (There are exceptions where multiple households were recorded on one sheet.) The cover page gives the names of the tribe, reservation, agency, and post office. The dwelling number in order of visitation is also on this page, as well as the type of dwelling. Abbreviations used were “H” — house (sometimes with a description of what it was made of), “P” — pueblo, or “L” — lodge (again, sometimes including what it was made of). The subsequent image lists:Indian name (with an English translation and any alternate names regularly used) of each person in the family, relationship to the head of the family, marital and tribal status, degree of tribal ancestry, length of time on the reservation, whether individual wore “citizen’s dress” (white man’s clothing), languages spoken, gender, age (as of census date of 1 October 1880), and for those born within the year, the month they were born, occupation, whether sick or disabled, type of infirmities, whether vaccinated, literacy and whether attended school within the year, number of horses, cattle, sheep, swine and dogs owned, number and types of firearms owned, details on the amount of property owned and cultivated, by patent, allotment, or tribal regulation, whether self-supporting or supported by family, government, civilized industries, hunting, fishing, or gathering.

U.S., Indian Wills, 1910-1921

In accordance with federal statutes enacted in 1910 and 1913, the Law and, subsequently, the Probate Divisions of the Bureau of Indian Affairs were responsible for determining the heirs of deceased Indian trust allottees. Ultimately, Native Americans submitted more than 2,500 pages of wills and probate records to the Bureau. These records span the period 1910 to 1921 and, with a few exceptions, pertain to Indian families living in the Plains and several western states. Researchers will find members of the following tribes represented in this collection: Chippewa, Sioux, Apache, Shawnee, Quapaw, Assinboin, Leach Lake Chippewa, Confederated Flathead, Ponca, Cheyenne, Crow, Sac & Fox, Nez Perce, Southern Ute, Omaha, Osage, and more.

Navajo Springs, Colorado Ute Census, 1904-08

Established in 1892, the Fort Lewis Indian School, located just 14 miles south and west of Durango, Colorado, operated for 18 years before being closed by the Federal Government in 1910. This database is a collection of records prepared by the school superintendents between 1904 and 1908. Each record reveals the individual's Native American and English name along with information regarding sex, age and relationship to the head of household. With nearly 3400 entries, this can be a great aid to researchers of Native American ancestors.        

Indians of the Pike's Peak Region

This database contains information relating to the Indian tribes in the region of Pike's Peak in Colorado. The author, having lived in the area of Pike's Peak for some time, and also having had much interaction with the local Indians, is very familiar with the information he is writing about and presenting in this work. His main object in creating the work was to make a permanent record of the primary events concerning the Indians in the 1860s. Topics covered in this history include the tribes of the Pike's Peak region; trails, mineral springs, and game; the Indian troubles of 1864; the Third Colorado and the Battle of Sand Creek; and the Indian War of 1868. This database could be valuable to those with Indian ancestors and also those with ancestors who were living in Colorado in the 1860s.

Navajo Springs, Colorado Ute Census, 1904-08

Established in 1892, the Fort Lewis Indian School, located just 14 miles south and west of Durango, Colorado, operated for 18 years before being closed by the Federal Government in 1910. This database is a collection of records prepared by the school superintendents between 1904 and 1908. Each record reveals the individual's Native American and English name along with information regarding sex, age and relationship to the head of household. With nearly 3400 entries, this can be a great aid to researchers of Native American ancestors.

The U.S. Federal Census records and U.S. Military Records are also available from Ancestry.com. For information about these collections see Federal Records.